Introduction

 

(Looking for my Blog? Click here.)

Welcome to Blocked Tear Duct Surgery for Adults. My name is George Parker, and I’ve created this website from my personal experience of treatment for watery eye (epiphora), and the medical mismanagement I suffered from an attempt to fix it. It’s a website for adults with epiphora and those whom have had surgery or other interventions for this condition. It’s a place to share your experiences and learn from others.

The website is also for medical professionals, especially oculoplastic surgeons—to make them more aware of the frustration their so-called ‘cured’ patients feel when risks become reality. Many complex problems arise as a result of this procedure, including (with the worst kind of irony) severe and painful dry eye, and it seems that surgeons are unwilling to take these risks seriously.

I am advocating against the irresponsible overuse of DCR (dacryocystorhinostomy) surgery. It has caused me many problems, including severe dry eye and air regurgitation upon breathing and speaking (which I will discuss in detail later). I was told very little about the operative procedure and complications. According to those I’ve consulted, the damage to my eye drainage system is permanent and irreversible. I want to save you from the same fate—or, if you’ve already gone through the surgery and have problems, to let you know that you are not alone.

By profession I am a naturopath and a massage therapist, and have been practicing various alternative and complementary therapies for the past twenty years. I am educated—I studied at the Endeavour College of Natural Health—well read, and very proactive and hands-on in terms of my own health. Yet, here I am—a victim of a hasty and unnecessary surgery. How did this happen, what could have been done to prevent it, and what can be done to help those affected? These are the questions we’ll investigate here.

>READ ON

  6 Responses to “Introduction”

  1. I totally agree with unnecessary medical intervention urging; many older doctors don’t retire because of their love of their practice – its because they fear legal charges relating to malpractice – and have to work to keep paying their insurance premiums – in case their maladroit practice gets them into court!!

  2. What’s up to every one, the contents existing at this web site are truly remarkable for people knowledge, well, keep up the nice work fellows.

  3. I have stumbled upon your blog by reading another blog. Thank you so much for making an effort to create and maintain this blog. It makes me feel better just from realizing that I am not alone with my quest for common sense and pragmatic approach for this annoying problem. I have blocked tear ducks in both of my eyes and and have had an initial surgery scheduled a couple of month ago. Luckily (a silver lining?!), I was not admitted to this surgery due to an untreated hypertension. Now, that my hypertension is under control, I have rescheduled the surgery. Upon the caring insistence from my husband, I have been doing an extensive research online from the fellow “sufferers” and within the first couple of hours found so many mentioned concerns, issues, and discomforts that it made me seriouslu rethink this surgery and the benefirts from having it. I am diving right into your blog. THANK YOU!!!

  4. I have too much tear in both an eye as that I got a block tear conduct and by don’t know what happen to cause it , after I check from doctor and now the doctor advise that I need to surgery, but I do not want to surgery. Both side of eye ‘s tear conduct has been block , as the right side was serious one.
    special at windy, too cold , talking with someone, while that it will appear to my an eye. Can do anything eg. message or….. to fixed it ?!! make tear conduct back to normal .

    • It’s difficult to understand your English. You were probably offered a DCR surgery. Yes, other alternatives exist and they should always be offered, but never are. For just a tearing eye, it seems they have to cut you open and drill through your bone, ignoring the life long effects it may have. Where is the doctors creed, “First do no harm”?

      It’s difficult to find a surgeon to use a non-invasive technique. I am referring to NO SURGERY as you want and congratulations for being vigilant on this. You can try hot compresses, massage the tear sac and pushing extra fluid out of it. If it’s infected you may purchase antibiotic drops over the counter. Meanwhile try your best to find a surgeon who’ll attempt to probe or use the alternative solutions shown in my website here. Good luck!

  5. Unfortunately, I had a bad experience myself. I had my surgery almost 3 years ago. I had relief for less than a year and then the headaches came back with a vengeance. Then came the watery eyes. About 2 months ago, it was getting worse. I went to clean out my nose and pulled, what felt to be a tube, and I felt the corner of my eye sink it. My eye started swelling and it had a constant dischage. I went to the ER and was informed that my tube was supposed to taken out 3 years ago. Went back to my eye surgeon and he was also shocked and told me that I have a bacterial infection due to that tube being in so long. I was livid! Now they have scheduled surgery to take it out. Removal of the tube would have been done in office but, unfortunately, mine has become attatched to surrounding tissues. Have you ever heard of such nonsense?

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